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Carlsen Wins The Chess Masters Final

  • SonofPearl
  • on 13-10-12 13:41.

Magnus Carlsen official website 2.jpgMagnus Carlsen won the 5th Chess Masters Final in a tie-break playoff with Fabiano Caruana after both players drew their final round games in Bilbao.

Caruana took a quick draw with black against Paco Vallejo, who seemed happy to make a quick exit after announcing his retirement from chess after yesterday's painful loss to Karjakin.

Carlsen had to work a little harder before earning a draw against Lev Aronian, but the result never seemed in much doubt.

The tie-break was played over two games at the rate of 4 minutes plus 3 seconds increment.  Carlsen won with the black pieces in the first game and then took advantage of Caruana blundering a piece early in the second game to seal his triumph.

Vishy Anand seemed determined to finish his disappointing tournament on a high in a no-holds barred fight with Sergey Karjakin, but a draw left the world champion back in 5th place.

The final standings (3-1-0 scoring)

# Name Fed Elo Pts
1 Caruana, Fabiano  ITA 2773 17
2 Carlsen, Magnus  NOR 2843 17
3 Aronian, Levon  ARM 2816 11
4 Karjakin, Sergey  RUS 2778 10
5 Anand, Viswanathan  IND 2780 9
6 Vallejo Pons, Francisco  ESP 2697 6

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Fabiano Caruana took a quick draw with Vallejo. A mistake in retrospect?

Bilbao 2012 Round 10 Fabiano Caruana Paco Vallejo.jpg

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Magnus Carlsen drew his final game with Lev Aronian

Bilbao 2012 Round 10 Magnus Carlsen Lev Aronian.jpg

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The playoff games

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So in the end Magnus Carlsen made a remarkable comeback in the second half of the tournament in Bilbao to claim victory, repeating his success in last year's edition, also in a tie-break, against Vassily Ivanchuk.

Fabiano Caruana missed out on the tournament victory after a great start in Sao Paulo, but his live rating continues to soar, now placing him at world #5 ahead of Anand and Karjakin.

Hopefully Paco Vallejo will reconsider his hasty retirement decision.  The popular Spaniard was always going to be the underdog in this tournament, but his play was enterprising and deserved a little more luck as a reward.

World champion Vishy Anand had a very disappointing tournament, and has been playing below par for quite some time.  Can he regain his form and confidence before his next title defence, expected in October/November 2013?

Bilbao 2012 Round 10 Magnus Carlsen Winner.jpg

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Games via TWIC. Photos from the Bilbao Masters official website.

16319 x gelezen 80 commentaren
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Reacties


  • 22 maanden geleden

    Steve212000

    He might have a problem,with Arononian,or Karjakin,but he's got to be the favorite. i remember,it was only a couple of years ago, I was wondering how he would do against the big boys. I guess he answered that! ;p

  • 22 maanden geleden

    keithjoshua777

    The best chessplayer always wins at the end of the tourney. Kudos to Magnus Carlsen! He just need to prove to the world one thing: beat Anand for the World Chess Championship.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    SonofPearl

    I hope Vallejo enjoys his break from chess and comes back refreshed and better than ever!

  • 23 maanden geleden

    _valentin_

    Good luck to Vallejo on his newly sprouting projects!  At his age, this is quite normal for people to re-evaluate their lives and their priorities, and to make some changes and experiment boldly in new directions.  Many of us have been through it, so it's worthwhile.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    SonofPearl

    The official site quotes Vallejo as saying, “In order to play chess you must have hope, and I have lost it. I have been 20 years out of my hometown, since I was 10, and it is time to go back and rest. I don't want to say that I will not play more, because other champions have retired and then they have come back some years after with excellent results. However, I need a break from chess and to start over some other vital projects. After that, we will see.”

  • 23 maanden geleden

    Dimitrije_Mandic

    Thanks for the reply, _valentin_!

  • 23 maanden geleden

    _valentin_

    Dimitrije_Mandic:  I believe the answer to your question is in the timing for finishing the tournament on the day it is said to finish.  After all, everyone has to be present at the closing ceremony by contract (I believe), and so taking another day or so for the sake of determining a tie-break winner doesn't seem to be sufficiently beneficial.  Also, some of these players literally fly from one tournament to another in the busy parts of the year, with very tight in-between schedules (just ask Caruana and others like him, who play in a ton of places), so they can't afford to possibly sit around and wait for a delayed finish, just so that they can get on with their next event.

    That said, I can see the potential reasonableness of 2 rapid games (15'+5") -- that would only delay things by another couple of hours, which is likely okay in some venues.  Still, blitz is at this time the preferred method for resolving tie-breaks in many tournaments.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    Jahnudvipa

    Of course, dress-code. Somehow I just thought the greatest chess-minds of the world were above that. My being naive... if your want to make money you have to conform.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    pagan_idol

    Its time for a set number of the top tournaments in the world to form an alliance, award world championship points based on the tournament outcomes. The points winner faces the reigning champion that year for the right to challenge that years world champion. In other words a league and not a bunch of non associated tournaments that only effect ratings and or the winner of one big tournament every other year or something gets to play for a  championship in a couple years or some such when new ratings and talents have come and gone.

    FIDE could  run the league and compile stats and ELO on players and tounaments outside this league alliance and decide who participates in the next years league and who exits.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    PUNTHAMURRA

    He never ceases to AMAZE!! does Carlsen.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    nightmare_chess

    go magnus!! i love u Kiss

  • 23 maanden geleden

    Steve212000

    Yeah,they've got a dress code. It's all part of the ongoing effort,to make chess good for spectators. If they want to compete for the big money,you have to play by their rules. 

  • 23 maanden geleden

    Jahnudvipa

    Good grief, they are all wearing suits. Who wears a suit, except some clone of the Coca-cola culture? 

  • 23 maanden geleden

    eaglejorge

    Congratulations!!

  • 23 maanden geleden

    pawngenius

    Carlsen has a great social life. He has lots of girlfriends.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    Dimitrije_Mandic

    Since I figured that posts like these were the best for heated (and therefore well-followed, but not necessarily unproductive!) debates, I've decided to ask a question myself: Why do the tournament directors decide on holding tie-breaks with such short time controls opposed to the standard tournament ones? Is it because the tournaments need to be finished quickly after the last round or something? After all, the players are fully informed about all the tournament rules and parameters in advance, so I don't see an overly good reason not to hold a tie-break match with, for example, a halved time control compared to the one in the regular rounds, and only shorten it further if the score is even after 2 or 4 (or any even number they wish) games. It's not like that's lawful only in World Championship matches... is it? I mean, this seems like a really important chess tournament, so what is (or what do you think is) the logic behind such decisions?

  • 23 maanden geleden

    Vingore

    Carlsen is the greatest!

  • 23 maanden geleden

    metamorfose

    Ok, Carlsen won. Everyone already knows. Now other news from the world of chess please.

  • 23 maanden geleden

    SonofPearl

    @ snakehandler - not quite.  His current 'live' rating is 2847.6 according to www.2700chess.com/

  • 23 maanden geleden

    snakehandler

    Does this mean that Carlsen is the best of all time now? Is his rating now higher than Kasparov's highest (2851 ELO)?

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