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Carlsen Beats Anand Again, Leads 4-2 - UPDATE: VIDEO

  • PeterDoggers
  • on 16-11-13 07:03.

On Saturday Magnus Carlsen increased his lead in the World Championship match against Viswanathan Anand to 4-2. In a quiet Ruy Lopez, the 22-year-old Norwegian equalized comfortably, got a slight initiative, won a pawn, then another one but the rook ending was probably still drawn. However, Anand again failed to find the best defense and had to resign at move 67.

And he did it again. With an almost unprecedented will to win, Magnus Carlsen ground down Vishy Anand in another rook ending to take a two-point lead in the match. The cold, engine-driven evaluations were constantly saying "draw", but the practical problems Anand had to solve again proved to be too much for the 44-year old Indian GM.

VIDEO

Avoiding the Berlin Ending with the move 4.d3 seemed like a good practical decision by the World Champion, and his 10.Bg5 got Carlsen thinking for 25 minutes. From move 15 onwards, it was clear that Anand was going to try his luck on the kingside. Step one was to try and land a knight on f5.

However, Carlsen found a number of excellent maneuvers and when all the minor pieces were traded it was clear that Black was at least equal. In fact, after 26...c4! it suddenly became clear that it was the Norwegian who was playing for a win.

With a timely exchange, Carlsen left his opponent with a bad pawn structure but the question was how he would improve further. “I thought I got a pretty solid position out of the opening. Then at some point I was little bit better but nothing much was going on.” But then, Anand either “sacrificed or blundered” a pawn, as Carlsen put it at the press conference. Asked about his surprising 38.Qg3, Anand said: “What can I say, some days it just goes like that.”


Carlsen obviously took the pawn, and it was clear that he was going to torture his opponent for quite some time. “After that I got a very good rook ending but I am not at all sure if it is winning,” the challenger said. As he allowed h4-h5 Anand was well on his way to draw the game anyway, until Carlsen found one more miniplan. “I had one little trap, this Kf4-Ke3 etc. Fortunately he went for it.”

Both players felt that it was all over when Black got Ke3 in, but analysis shows that there was still one more chance to draw with White, missed by Anand, on move 60.


Vishy Anand was clearly upset. “I mean, today was a heavy blow. I will not pretend otherwise. Nothing to be done, you just go on.” A Norwegian journalist asked how he would deal with it, to which Anand answered: “Well you just do your best.” The same journalist wanted him to elaborate on his answer, to which Anand answered: “Doing your best means doing your best. I dont know why you don't understand English?”

Sunday is another rest day. On Monday the second half of the match starts, with Vishy Anand again playing with the white pieces. He needs a win soon.

The players in the rest area, minutes before the start of the game
Anand getting his tea, like every day
Carlsen arrives, and the players shake hands — Anand doesn't look up
Still many media are represented in Chennai
Another Berlin, but we won't see the ending this day
Vishy Anand deeply concentrated and under pressure
Carlsen obviously more relaxed, sitting on a 3-2 lead

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Reacties


  • 10 maanden geleden

    P_G_M

    Great comment by savantz.

  • 10 maanden geleden

    srains

    If 67. Ra1, Re3 68. Kg2, Re1 or 68. Rf1, Kf3

  • 10 maanden geleden

    ildolphino

    @taylor1313: probably the win is clear to him. For being a genius and not needing more time, he gets rewarded by some people with ungrounded insinuations.

  • 10 maanden geleden

    taylor1313

    I'm a huge Magnus Fan so it pains me to point this out....but Magnus in game six leaves the table in very critical moments during the end game. I don't know if he did this in game 5 because I didn't watch the game commentary. hmmm....makes one wonder is all I'm saying.

  • 10 maanden geleden

    Hans-Kristoph-H

    Vishy now has a tough mountain to climb as everyone knows. I love Carlsen's fighting mentality and commitment to winning. Vishy is a great champion and might be capable of regrouping and coming back. As an analogy, I think of the Red Army in WW2 as everyone except the Soviets had written them off. Vishy hasn't lost the match yet!

  • 10 maanden geleden

    Spektrowski

    Anand is really like a modern-era Botvinnik. Won the title in a match tournament, then fended off the best of his contemporaries (Bronstein and Smyslov in Botvinnik's case, Kramnik, Topalov and Gelfand in Anand's), and now he's facing an up-and-coming hotshot (Tal then, Carlsen now).

  • 10 maanden geleden

    herbyrawley

    todays very top players are better in the same way that milers are

    the level of competition is also much more level with all having access  computors

    Anand has beaten off Kramnik, Gelfand & Topalov

    as strong a crew of challengers as any has had to face.

  • 10 maanden geleden

    Mulaton

    @yashar04 one name that comes to my mind is marshall

  • 10 maanden geleden

    vanraj2014

    Thanks Rommeldam

  • 10 maanden geleden

    savantz

    Lesson here: Endgames that GMs, for decades, have dismissed as theoretical draws (and in fact they are), particularly rook and pawn endgames; have (in this match) been exposed to pose extraordinarily difficult technical challenges. Today's GMs have ignored this as it requires hundreds of hours of study to proficiency. Carlsen is opening a new era where these endgames will have to be taken much more seriously. Consider this...

    "As Olafsson (an Icelander) showed me, White can win... It's hard to believe. I stayed up all night analyzing, finally convincing myself, and, incidentally, learning a lot about Rook and Pawn endings in the process." -- Bobby Fischer

    Here is Soviet GMs assessment [circa 1970] after Fischer took the chess world by storm!

    "He plays the endgame particularly forcefully, making use of every chance to achieve his goal. Even in the simplest positions, which seem absolutely drawn, he does not give up the struggle and continues seeking the slightest opportunity to confuse his opponent. No sooner does Fischer's opponent slacken his attention for a moment than retribution is imminent."

    Sounds like they're assessing Carlsen

  • 10 maanden geleden

    yashar04

    It's very unfortunate for Anand and Kramnik. Despite winning world championships and being ahead of the rest of the world for such a long time (I truly believe that they have a much higher quality than the rest of the top ten players who have appeared on the top ten list in these years except kaspy and MC), they've never been able to undisputably dominate the game and have always been under the umbrella of a giant.

    If Magnus and Kasparov are the contemporary Fischers, Alekhines, and Capablancas, I don't know who is comparable with Anand and Kramnik?

  • 10 maanden geleden

    Rommeldam

    Ra1 then Re6 and if Rf1 Kf3 followed by Ke2

  • 10 maanden geleden

    a_hero

    If Ra1 then Black plays Re6

  • 10 maanden geleden

    vanraj2014

    Atleast you are not alone thinking same..:) Come on grandmasters..some one please explain this??

  • 10 maanden geleden

    gary11378

     very last move-wouldn't Ra1 and Ra3+ repitatdly bring draw?

  • 10 maanden geleden

    vanraj2014

    Sorry my mistake, i mean Ra1 and not Ra8!

  • 10 maanden geleden

    vanraj2014

    Konstantyn,I asked same question.:).I couldnt see how Black can win afer Ra8 insted of Ra8.

  • 10 maanden geleden

    srains

    I feel that 24. fxe3 was a mistake that lead to Anands problems. He did not get any attack out of the half-open f file, and Magnus exploited the weakness of the doubled e pawns beautifully. 

  • 10 maanden geleden

    Konstantyn

    Can anyone say something about Anand's last move:Why Ra8? Why not Ra1????

  • 10 maanden geleden

    srinu_doc

    Carlsen is exploiting Anand's fatigue factor. It's all psychological game. 

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