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Candidates Tournament Round 12

  • SonofPearl
  • on 29-03-13 14:06.

Annotations by GM Sam Shankland
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The drama reached fever-pitch in round 12 of the London Candidates Tournament today, as the event neared its final stages. It was a fantastic round where the result of the two crucial games was unclear until the very end.

After yesterday's 11th round Vladimir Kramnik claimed he would be happy to draw his vital game with Lev Aronian today with the black pieces. Yet when he played the bold anti-positional 10...f5 it was clear that he was targeting more than half a point!

Aronian found himself under great pressure and Kramnik grabbed a winning advantage with the beautiful 25...Be4. It seemed to be all over, but somehow Kramnik allowed Aronian back into the game and at the first time control computer analysis had it dead level.  However, the position wasn't so easy for tired carbon based life-forms near the end of a tournament after hours of hard-fought play. Aronian was unable to distract Kramnik's bishop with his extra pawns and Kramnik won the game!

Vladimir Kramnik won an amazing game against Aronian

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Lev Aronian was outplayed by Kramnik and missed his drawing chance

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The other crucial game was Magnus Carlsen's encounter with the unpredictable Vassily Ivanchuk. This time Chucky played a mainline defense, the Sicilian Taimanov, and when Carlsen spent fully 20 minutes thinking about his 13th move Bd4, it was clear something had already gone badly wrong for the tournament leader.

Carlsen has a great record against Ivanchuk and had already managed to save some difficult positions in the tournament, but this time it was too much to ask. Ivanchuk brought home the full point after 7 gruelling hours for a shock win which gives the tournament lead to Kramnik. "I think I played absolutely disgracefully from move one" said an obviously gutted Carlsen at the press conference.

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Magnus Carlsen...where did it all go wrong?

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The game between Boris Gelfand and Peter Svidler was the first to finish, and after a balanced struggle a draw was agreed once the first time control was reached.

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Boris Gelfand and Peter Svidler drew their game

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The game between Teimour Radjabov and Alexander Grischuk was another long struggle. Radjabov held an endgame advantage but was unable to convert a rook plus f and h pawn against rook ending, and the game ended in a draw.

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Teimour Radjabov and Alexander Grischuk

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Tomorrow is a rest day, so the penultimate round is on Sunday, and the final round Monday. The UK also moves onto BST (British Summer Time), so games will start at 13:00 GMT (14:00 BST).

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The standings after 12 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 8
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872
Levon Aronian ARM 2809
Peter Svidler RUS 2747 6
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 5
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793 4

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand 1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik 1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen 0 - 1 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian 0 - 1 Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

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Reacties


  • 17 maanden geleden

    Rizakor

    I love how people throw fire on Carlsen for just saying "I think I played absolutely disgracefully from move one".

    For some reason... the majority of you want to interpret this as belittling Chucky's skills, when in fact Carlsen could just be telling the truth. Perhaps he actually did feel he played a horrible game throughout the entire match and has absolutely no intention of belittling anyone... why take a neutral statement such as this and blow it up as an attack on other players? Can Carlsen not say that he played a bad game without getting attack? If this is the case, does Carlsen have to lie and say he played wonderful chess when in fact he may think otherwise?

    I suppose people interpret things the way they want to. If you want to see something in the light of drama, you will twist words and make perceptions to draw a conclusion as if the speaker has intended this. 

  • 17 maanden geleden

    andrewjacob

    i think that carlsen will have a much better chance beating anand than kramnik

  • 17 maanden geleden

    KilgoreBass

    71. c6 DRAWS
  • 17 maanden geleden

    rana2000

    that is the nature of humans. When someone good lose ..all people start attacking him? as if they are better??. Goooo carlsen you can do it. 

  • 17 maanden geleden

    ChocolateTeapot

    In the Carlsen v. Ivanchuk games, 71. c6 Ke6 72. Rb5 Kd6 73. Rc5 Kxc5 is an interesting alternative to 73...Kc7, as far as I can see.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Eeyore12

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 maanden geleden

    kosiu_drumev

    After what we sow today it is even harder to beleve Ivanchuk was not involved in mach fixing. And I'm afraid we will see another strange opening and time lose from him in the last round, if it is needed.

    By the way, to Eyore12, who wrote "Ivanchuk lost on time against Carlsen, but fought like a tiger to save the game vs. Kramnik". Where did you see these games, man??? Are you blind or drunk, or ... Shame on you!!!

    The sad thing is that only WCM Anand-Carlsen can be of any use for the popularity of our beloved game. But if it will not to be, Carlsen is to be blamed, because he played fade games against Kramnik and Aronian and get no single win against them here.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    checkersgosu

    At the end of hte day, none of these "candidates" would last 30 moves against Ivanov.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Incrense

    Yeah its so fair and right to play Budapest gambit against aronian and not play Latvian gambit against carlsen !!

  • 17 maanden geleden

    LeeCooper78

    Well, that was hard to expect, but not completely unpredictable. Psychology was the key for Magnus and he handled it very poorly. He had to take the fight to Chucky, he had the white pieces and yet he played very passive. It was not "from the move one", but already around move 15, black had the advantage. And he didn't mess it up in the ending, he messed it up earlier, it was always going to be very unpleasant for white to play that ending. Nevertheless, not everyone could bring home the full point in that ending - Chucky was playing very fine, deserves the praise.

    Kramnik - well, the man's a true hero of those 12 rounds. 12 games against the best oponents in the world (minus Vishy) and NOT A SINGLE worse position. That is truly remarkable! You may like his style or not (let's not forget that his style was completely different BEFORE winning the crown), but his skill is absolutely unquestionable - he is already one of the greats!

    Now, Magnus has a point to prove - one cannot win this kind of tournament in a straightforward fashion. Too many strong players, too many different styles, too many weird psychologies... Sometimes, you need to mix it up. And this is the time...

    Although I am a Kramnik fan, I think that Magnus is a great asset of the game and don't have a doubt that he will be the world champion sooner or later.

    Volodya will have a hard time against Boris and Chucky. Gelfand will play for a win - no dilema there. His repertoire is wide enough to allow him that. Volodya will have to take the fight to him, otherwise, the exact same thing that happened to Magnus today might happen to him. If you just wait for mistakes, you might end up being the one who makes them.

    And Carlsen - well, Radjabov won't be an easy nut to crack. But the difference in the willpower between those two is huge. Compared just by the chess skill - I truly doubt Magnus could win with black. But the chess skill is not the only thing that counts.

    My prediction is - if Kramnik can squeeze 1,5 out of 2 he will win, otherwise Carlsen will find his way to the first place.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Paulzzz

    Too much attention of the public, too many compliments from the fans, heaps of money from the sponsors - all these things can be hazardous to the Norwegian's character. The result is that he sometimes loses his wits. No one is flawless.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Spiffe

    Geez, harsh on Carlsen.  I'm by no means his biggest fan, but I can't blame him for being bummed about blowing the tournament lead.

    May the best player win.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    andrushek

    OMG, Kramnik sucks. It is a absoluts shame to see all these comments commending his sorry lackluster play; draw, draw, draw--so weak. We need a new Kasparov not a new Karpov! However, Kramnik's play in this last round was amazing, and I give him full credit for the win. If only he would play like this more!

  • 17 maanden geleden

    MSC157

    Wooow, Kramnik must win just one more game and he will probably be the new World Champion! Yeah, you heard it right. :)

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Incrense

    Woah comon kramnik only made about 5 blunder this game but luckily for him Aronian managed to make more than that .!!

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Paulzzz

    Kramnik deserves to win this tournament because he shows much higher skills than Carlsen. Carlsen is younger, quite talented and very likely sooner or later in his life he will become the World Champion. Of course, if he does not quit chess till that time. However, the Norwegian is a rather arrogant person who yet needs some schooling.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    MartinEden

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 17 maanden geleden

    nebunulpecal

    Aronian - Kramnik, a game for the books. Kramnik's brave idea ...f7-f5 is really something that should tell us about courage. It reminds me of Kasparov's 8...d5 in the 16th game of the match with Karpov in 1985. Maybe not entirely sound, but something that proves that the fighting chess is not dead. Just for that move alone it would really be a shame not to see Kramnik win this tournament...

    For me, the best game so far was Carlsen - Gelfand, the most interesting were Svidler - Grischuk, Svidler - Gelfand and both encounters between Aronian and Kramnik and the most beautiful combination was what Kramnik did yesterday after Radjabov took on a2 with the Queen.

  • 17 maanden geleden

    Maiqtheliar

    anand must be biting his nails the match comes closer

  • 17 maanden geleden

    MartinEden

    "I think I played absolutely disgracefully from move one" said an obviously gutted Carlsen at the press conference.

    OMG, what a bad loser this kid is and what a disgraceful thing to say. Instead of admitting defeat and saying gg, he is trying to belittle Chucky's  skills. I hope that Kramnik would win the tournament, so this arrogant kid will just keep collecting his rating points. Good luck in reaching 5000 Carlsen. You may also wish to look up for some books about good sportsmanship manners for dummies. 

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