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Playing in Your Opponent's Backyard

  • GM Gserper
  • | 6 jan. 2013
  • | 13983 x bekeken
  • | 30 reacties

In last week's column we discussed a hustler's trick where he would offer you a position where you could choose White or Black and the hustler would take the opposite side and beat you.

Sometimes top chess players borrow this trick from the hustler's toolbox.  Judge for yourself: 

This is game #38 of the first marathon World Championship match Karpov - Kasparov.  This wasn't the most exciting game to put it mildly, but look at what happened the very next day. Apparently, Karpov wasn't satisfied by his own treatment of this variation and he was interested to know what Kasparov considered the best defense for Black. Of course he could politely ask his opponent, but since it was the World Championship Match he pretty much knew how Kasparov would answer Smile. So, Karpov used the simplest method to find out the answer, he played the same variation as White!


So, Kasparov showed Karpov how to play this position for Black and therefore the case was closed, right?  Not so fast! Karpov knew better... he suspected that Kasparov didn't show everything and still kept an ace up his sleeve. So, when in the next game of their match the opponents had the familiar position Karpov deviated first!


Yes, Karpov suffered through the whole game, but managed to escape for a draw.  We'll never know what Kasparov had prepared in case Karpov followed their previous games, but I believe that somehow Karpov's legendary intuition saved him again. An indirect proof of some sort can be found in the next episode. The year was 1983 and Kasparov was facing Victor Korchnoi in a 'Candidate's match'. In order to win the match Kasparov needed just half a point out of the two remaining games, but as he admitted in his book, he wanted to finish the match with "an exclamation mark"!

Fastforward 18 years and the FIDE World Champion Rustam Kasimdzhanov used Kasparov's idea... against Kasparov! 

This game is very interesting on many levels.  First of all it is a very fine example of Kasparov's trademark energetic play, where his opponent virtually gets annihilated. Secondly, the game features a unique double blunder--both super GMs missed a simple move (10...Be5!) which won instantly. I truly hope that our readers would do much better since we discussed this typical pattern previously: http://www.chess.com/article/view/typical-patterns-everyone-should-know-the-trapped-rook

And finally, just like that hustler, Kasparov showed 'how to promote the pawn', but still had some surprises left for his opponent!

Even if you are not going to play Kasparov in your next tournament, the lesson is simple.  Say your opponent is an expert in a certain opening, it definitely makes sense to play some other variation, or even surprise your opponent before he surprises you! We discussed this approach in a number of articles, for instance: http://www.chess.com/article/view/how-to-learn-an-opening-in-one-hour

Good luck!

Reacties


  • 19 maanden geleden

    niranjanh

    I HAVE TRIED THIS TRICK WITH THE PLAYER WHOSE RATINGS WERE HIGHER THAN ME EVEN BEFORE READING THIS ARTICLE . THIS TRICK HAS A GREAT ADVANTAGE TO BOTH THE PLAYER AS ONE GETS TO LEARN AND OTHER GETS TO SHARPEN HIS KNOWLEGDE ABOUT A PARTICULAR POSTION. 

  • 20 maanden geleden

    jbirchley

    An excellent artical and fascinating theme. I imagine the situation arises quite often (I adnit to having done it myself)

    "Fast Eddie" Felson of chess .... I wonder if there is anything like that in "The Queens Gambit" with Beth Harmon Wink

  • 20 maanden geleden

    shahrokh1975

    THANKS!

  • 20 maanden geleden

    melvinbluestone

    Borrowing a trick from the hustler's toolbox, eh? So Kasparov is sort of the "Fast Eddie" Felson of chess...... How do you spell that in Cyrillic?

  • 20 maanden geleden

    Songyu123

    @VivaCristoRey

    The position in the first diagram is wrong, Adrenalyn has already drawn attention to this a bit earlier. The 16th move for black is Rfd8 (and not Rfc8).

  • 20 maanden geleden

    VivaCristoRey

    In the first game, is there any reason Kasparov didn't play 22. Nxa7? It looks like it wins a pawn and forks the queen and rook, winning the exchange. I think they both noticed it afterward, which is why Karpov tried to reach the same position, but Kasparov played 16. ... Rfd8 as black in the second game to avoid the fork - the only difference between the two games before move 22.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    homernh

    Okay, that makes sense, thank you. 

  • 20 maanden geleden

    jthomassie

    In the third diagram, doesn't 71. Ne7+ win the pawn?   I don't understand 71. Nc3.

    If the game plays out like you suggest, (71. Ne7+), black responds with 71. ... Kh5. Then after 72. Nxf5 Nxg5, if white takes the knight then black's king will take the remaining pawn and the game will be drawn by insufficient mating material. If white instead then moves his king, black then only needs to trade his knight for the pawn to achieve a draw which he will eventually do.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    homernh

    In the third diagram, doesn't 71. Ne7+ win the pawn?   I don't understand 71. Nc3.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    Sethplays

    About the blunder it seems that if white just plays d6 and both black and white take the rooks that the game would at least be close since white would probably only eventually be down a pawn with both players having enemy bishops on their side.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    Ironknight777

    Departed!!

    GM Gserper : ur articles hold so much information, thanks for the share. 

  • 20 maanden geleden

    spiderman786

    Black missed Be5...

  • 20 maanden geleden

    GM Gserper

    Thank you, Adrenalyn, you have a good eye!  Of course it is a mistake in the database I got the game from.  The first 21 moves in two Karpov- Kasparov games are completely identical, therefore you are absolutely right, it is 16... Rfd8 and not Rfc8.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    tragicart

    awesome example!

  • 20 maanden geleden

    MSC157

    That's just amazing!

  • 20 maanden geleden

    Adrenalyn

    The first game I believe should read 16... Rfd8 and not Rfc8, as in the diagram position Nxa7 would be winning.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    NM Petrosianic

    I always found it interesting when players were willing to play both sides of theoretical discussions.  Thank you for showing these high level examples.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    RowdyRoddy

    I think d6 is followed by Nb6 winning the EXCHANGE (but not a full rook)?

  • 20 maanden geleden

    Heliotopos

    Cogwheel

    Actually, it is Ви́ктор Льво́вич Корчно́й.  Transliterations differ.

  • 20 maanden geleden

    sryiwannadraw

    gg

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